The BBC is dying… and nobody cares?

21/04/2016

Surprise: the government doesn’t like the BBC (shock horror!).  Another surprise: the government is going to destroy the BBC – indeed, that’s what it’s doing right now – and no one is lifting a finger to oppose this.  Presumably because no one knows about it.

That’s hardly surprising: As the New Statesman said:

The problem for our public service broadcaster is not that it lacks public support. On the contrary, the British people are passionately supportive of the BBC. The problem is that there are no newspapers, radio stations or television channels exposing just what is at stake. The traditional media is not on the pitch.

BBC executives have pursued a strategy of self-censorship; we can assume favouring a path of diplomacy. The popular press – notably the Murdoch papers – has most to gain from a US style broadcast market favoured by Whittingdale. We can expect little in the way of government scrutiny on their pages.

In George Osborne and Michael Gove – regarded by some as the two sharpest political operators in the Tory party – we have two of the most influential cabinet ministers in cahoots with Murdoch. Neither of whom has made any efforts to hide their admiration for him.

It’s BBC charter-renewal time again, and the Tory government wants to make sure that our “national broadcaster” doesn’t keep criticising it.  And it’s not just the Tories: it seems all the political parties are into the idea of de-fanging our BBC. Even the BBC, and its media friends/competitors have had little to say about John Whittingdale has said – that “he plans to have the government directly appoint most members of a new body to run the corporation” – that “only two or three members of a 13-strong unitary board, which would replace the discredited BBC Trust model, would be BBC executives while the rest would be government appointees” – effectively taking away the the BBC’s independence.  The BBC would become just another mouthpiece for the government’s spin, lies and propaganda.

But the politicos have forgotten about an important factor in this: Us.  The People of Britain.  The people who keep the politicians and their lick-spittle civil servants in their jobs.  As The New Statesman has it:

Nearly 400,000 of us have signed the 38 Degrees petition to protect our BBC. 177,000 of us made individual submissions to the government’s consultation on the BBC’s future. We are on the pitch – albeit against an elite outfit with unfair advantages. It is a perverse setting for a fair contest which raises serious questions about the plurality of the political sphere in Britain today.

The New Statesman goes on to tell us what the stakes are in this “game”:

First, its independence to decide on its channels, its programming and its news reporting. Interviewed for a Sunday newspaper last month, Whittingdale set out plans for the new body that will oversee the BBC to have a majority-Downing Street appointed board. People would be outraged to think that the government could hold such influence over news, programmes and the future of TV and radio channels. The revelation sits behind an online paywall having failed to make the BBC news bulletins.

Second, the money available to the BBC. Independent media consultants Enders Analysis have reported on the scale of cuts that the BBC has already faced – “a fall in total public service broadcast funding of at least 20% since 2010/2011”. Let us be under no illusion that without sustained public pressure, this erosion will be set to continue for the decade-long agreement that the government will deliver by year’s end.

Basically, the government wants to tell the BBC what it can and can’t report; if the Beeb dares to disobey, it will be beaten with the stick of “no-money-for-you-bigmouth”.

But the BBC has its fans out here in the real world.  According to a Yougov poll carried out for 38 Degrees, says the Guardian:

The government is not trusted by a majority of voters to protect the BBC during the forthcoming renewal of its charter, according to a poll that shows most people view the corporation as the most impartial and reliable news broadcaster in the UK.

A YouGov survey for the campaigning organisation 38 Degrees found that distrust of the government about its BBC reform plans is strongest among those aged over 60, the group most likely to be Tory supporters.

The poll, the first of its kind to look at attitudes to the BBC among older voters, found that 62% of over-60s are suspicious of government intentions, more than double the 27% who say they have faith in ministers to make the right decisions. The findings will raise increasing doubts among many Tory MPs about the political wisdom of meddling with an organisation seen by many of the party’s voters as a cherished part of British life.

Of all those questioned, 61% said the quality of the British media would deteriorate if commercial advertising were introduced on the BBC, against just 8% who think it would bring improvements.

Interesting, this reflection of over-60s.  The New Statesman also says:

people over 60 – a key political target group – do not trust the government to protect the BBC during the Charter renewal, with more than twice as many saying that they do not trust the government (62%) compared to those reporting that they do (27%)

David Babbs, executive director at 38 Degrees, which is heading a campaign to protect the BBC, said: “The BBC is a national treasure. But its future is at risk. Any government that damages the BBC will be on the wrong side of the British public. John Whittingdale’s proposed reforms are going down like a lead balloon with key groups of target voters.”

So, very few people – including those whose narural political “home” is at the bosom of the Tories, don’t like the fast-and-loose game the government is playing with the BBC.  Not too clever.  The Tories rely on the older voter – but messing with the cherished Beeb, coupled with the complaints and confusion over when, if ever, pensions will pay out as advertised, is alienating its bedrock.  I can’t say I’m dismayed at the idea of Cameron and his fellow pig-lovers losing their jobs.  But I really do hope they don’t take the Beeb down with them.  The BBC churns out some awful material… but it is innovative too, sometimes.  That would be a real loss.

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What has the Labour Party ever done for us..?

09/01/2013

This evening I was listening via BBC iPlayer to a Radio 4 show, “The History Plays 5: A History of Blair in Nine-and-a-Half Voices”. It’s the day after Tony Blair resigns as prime minister, and he’s in the bowels of the BBC waiting to be interviewed for a daytime TV show. He’s chatting to an impressionist, Sue (who thinks he’s a Tony Blair impersonator), and in the course of their conversation he tells her a joke he used to tell at Labour Party conferences – a variation on the “What have the Romans ever done for us?” skit:

TONY: What has the Labour Party done for us? Well, apart from putting a million people back to work, the Northern Ireland peace process, House of Lords reform; and apart from the creation of Scottish and Welsh assemblies, a booming economy, cancellation of African debt, reduction of hospital waiting times, increase in welfare spending, the Olympics…

SUE: …the Olympics, the Dome, the flogging off of state assets, dismantling of the NHS, massive increase in personal debt, and an unregulated the financial sector!

It’s quite funny; but then I noticed, Blair boasts of his “increase in welfare spending” as if it was a good thing. And it was a good thing, lifting families out of poverty (reducing child poverty in Britain was a key Labour policy, and a very popular one too), and, through the introduction of the minimum wage and tax credits, helping even low paid workers survive.

But now, the Tory-led Coalition government has turned this all around. According to the government, high welfare spending is bad – who cares if children live in poverty? Tax credits are for scroungers, and the minimum wage is a foul European import that must be scrapped as soon as possible! Nowadays helping the poor is not a priority: the government cut tax for the wealthy, and instead pile hardship on those who are already on the breadline.

The play actually made me feel nostalgic about the Blair years!! And that is, of course, certifiably insane! Well done, Cameron and Clegg, you’ve driven me crazy at last.

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Nonces, nonces everywhere – How many more ’70s TV stars will be nick-nicked for sex crimes?

03/01/2013

Jim Davidson - nonce?
Jim Davidson – ’70s has-been arrested for sex crimes

Today, the racist comedian and ex-gameshow host Jim Davidson was arrested on suspicion of sex offences, as part as Operation Yewtree, the Metropolitan Police investigation into sex crimes stemming from allegations made against the dead 1970s TV entertainer Jimmy Savile and others.

The police also arrested a 53-year old man in Hampshire, which takes the total number of people arrested under Operation Yewtree to nine. Apparently these two arrests fall into what the investigators are calling the “other” category, which means they think Davidson and the un-named man did not commit offences with Jimmy Savile – these alleged perverts were sating their foul appetites without a Savile connection… which means popular entertainers were possibly committing foul acts even when they weren’t with the Jim’ll Fix It presenter.

Jim Davidson was a popular celebrity during the 1970s, with his racist jokes – often about “Chalky White”, a fictitious Jamaican idiot caricature. His TV acts were “toned down” (though still vile with their contempt and hatred for black people); but he was also busy on the live stand-up comedy where his acts were the kind of entertainment you might expect to find at a BNP club. One of his repeated jokes concerned coppers going around saying “nick-nick”… and now he’s been nick-nicked himself! Couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy!!

Other ’70s figures arrested under Operation Yewtree include former pop star and famous child molestor Gary Glitter, comedian Freddie Starr, and “kiss-and-tell” publicist Max Clifford. I bet Clifford isn’t doing much “telling” about the “kissing” and whatever allegations have been against him! Looks like Clifford needs to find himself a good publicist!

Each new arrest makes it even more apparent how horrific it was behind the scenes at British television studios, celebrities with some kind of sense of entitlement, attacking vulnerable people while everyone around them covered it up. And let’s not forget the accusations made about Jimmy Savile: 450 people have made allegations against him, including 31 rapes – many of which apparently happened in hospitals where supposedly responsible health care professionals turned a blind eye, not wanting to kill the golden goose who brought in so much money from charity. Saint in public, sick abuser after dark: that’s the picture we’re getting of Sir Jimmy Savile, knighted for all the hard work he did destroying children’s lives.

When all the truth comes out – and it had better all come out, there’s no mood in the country for another feeble police whitewash – we will hopefully see not only how many entertainers were raping and abusing their fans, but also the officials at the BBC and the hospitals who knew what was going on but chose to let it happen. We cannot let the “establishment” get away with this. Even if some of those culpable are old and frail, we need to see them sentenced to long terms of imprisonment, just like aged Charlie Kray who was sent to jail even though he was very old and even though he was a victim of police entrapment. Sex offenses are amongst the most horrible of crimes – all involved need to be dealt with harshly.

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UK govt to press ahead with plan to cut off file-sharers’ internet access

19/11/2009

Well it’s official: yesterday (Wednesday) the UK government announced its intention to pass a law that will sever the internet connections of anyone suspected of illegally sharing files.

Through the medium of the “Queen’s Speech” (an archaic tradition by which the Queen announces the government’s legislative plans for the coming year) it was revealed that file-sharers’ broadband links will be disconnected without trial.

As the current government’s term is nearing its end, there’s a chance that they may run out of time before the “Digital Economy” bill is passed. But it doesn’t really matter: the opposition Conservative party supports this proposal too. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise: both the Tories and Labour have long been in love with big business. This proposed law is a sop to the music and film industries, who claim that “copyright theft” costs them hundreds of millions of pounds a year – they claim that they lost £486 million in 2007, and that an estimated 6.5 million Brits illegally downloaded music and films last year. Of course that’s nonsense: their calculations are based on the lie that every album or movie illegally downloaded represents a direct loss of revenue, completely ignoring the fact that most file-sharers would not have bought the records or videos they downloaded. But the industry can’t let the truth get in the way.

The government refuses to admit that innocent people may fall foul of the new law, despite the fact that wireless networks can be used by unauthorized downloaders and that multi-occupancy residences can contain more than one computer using the same IP address. I’m interested to see how the rights-owners or ISPs will be able to identify which downloads are illegal. Peer-to-peer protocols like bittorrent are used extensively for perfectly above-board downloads too. There’s been mention of using “phishing” techniques and “honeypot sites” to detect illegal transactions; hopefully this will all become clearer soon.

Many commentators believe that the film and music industries are just using file-sharers as scapegoats for their falling profits. Content providers need to come up with new business models that accommodate consumers’ changing habits.

Mark Schmid, from TalkTalk, said: “There’s been a real split among content owners when it comes to readjusting to the new digital landscape. Some – such as computer games companies – have been clever and come up with innovative ways to discourage piracy and maintain customer loyalty, for instance through adding extra levels to computer games that you only get if you’ve bought the product. But other content sectors – most notably the music industry – have failed to innovate and have blamed the internet for spoiling their old ways of doing business. We think this is extremely complacent. The internet is now a fact of life and we believe new business models need to be introduced if they want to survive and thrive in the digital world.”

Illegal downloading is not responsible for the film industry’s woes. Today’s widely-available fast broadband connections have made online streaming much more popular. There are legal free services, like BBC iPlayer, Channel 4’s 4OD service, and the US-based Hulu (set to come to Britain in 2010). And there are a great many ad-supported streaming sites like Youku and Megavideo. The film and TV content providers need to change their business model. But why should they, when governments are willing to make us reward their ineptitude?

Watch out, world: it’s happening in the UK now, and in France; but soon it’ll be in the USA, Australia, the rest of Europe… hell, everywhere. No one’s safe from the internet police.

If you don’t want this crazy plan to become law, you need to act!!  Visit the Open Rights Group web site to learn how you can help campaign against the internet disconnection bill!

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get_iplayer: the c00l way to download BBC shows

15/07/2009

BBC’s iPlayer service has allowed Windows users to download TV and radio shows for quite some time now. And apparently iPlayer Labs has offered an experimental download facility to Linux users in the past – though I can’t see any sign of it on their site currently. But of course there are hackers and developers out there offering software that answers this need for us Linuxers. You can check out a whole gaggle of such third party solutions at the beebhack wiki site.

Yep, there are a few progs featured there that will allow users of Linux to download BBC programmes. But there is only one that deserves to be called the best. So which is it? Get a load of get_iplayer.

So why have I chosen this particular app? I’m sure some of you will disagree with me – it’s a command-line utility for a start, and although some die-hard geeks think that the terminal is great, an increasing number of Linuxers prefer a GUI. But to that I say: Bah!

The reason I prefer get_iplayer to its competition is that it works great whether you’ve got the fastest light-fibre cable connection ever or a slow-crawling dial-up link. For users with good broadband there are funky functions like PVR and live-TV watching. And for those of us with slow, unreliable connection, there’s a simple download function that will resume recording where it left off if the connection should be interrupted.

Really we have Apple to thank for get_iplayer. Not that Apple had anything to do with creating it! Lord no, that’s a ridiculous notion! But Apple did create the iPhone. And the BBC decided they wanted to cater to people who own the stupid things. But the iPhone is so crap, it doesn’t play streaming content. So the BBC had to allow the Apple fanboi-phones to download the shows. And cunning get_iplayer can also download the content because it pretends to be an iPhone! Pretty sneaky, eh? It’s a classic hack.

Of course, the BBC doesn’t like this state of affairs. So they keep changing their system. But the get_iplayer devs just change their code to compensate. This means you need to update your version of the app fairly frequently. No need to fret though, you just use it with an –update flag and it’s all done automagically.

Believe me, I’m not the only person who thinks this command-line tool is great. There are a bunch of iPlayer-related projects that use get_iplayer. Some of them stick a pretty GUI front-end on the program. But the apps with a graphic interface haven’t worked for me – not a one of them. Whereas get_iplayer Just Works… as a good tool should.

Okay, okay, so sometimes get_iplayer doesn’t Just Work. Sometimes it claims to have finished downloading a show when really it hasn’t. But I’m pretty sure this is to do with my internet connection – I use a mobile phone to get my computer online, and it can be awfully quirky and unstable at times – so I doubt anyone using a more conventional connection will suffer from this problem. Seriously, if you use Linux and want to download BBC TV and radio shows – and even ITV shows – check out get_iplayer. You can download it from linuxcentre.net, and also find plenty of documentation. Seriously, get_iplayer is a bloody marvel! Try it out today!

NB: unfortunately, it will only download to UK-located domains. This isn’t down to get_iplayer – the BBC want to limit the iPlayer service to the United Kingdom. But there is a way around this for would-be viewers who don’t live here, involving the use of proxy servers. Check out the docs if you want to learn more!

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How to download & save streaming video from the internet, using Linux

30/03/2009

IMPORTANT: I HAVE UPDATED DOWNLOADING INFO. CHECK THIS LINK. BUT THIS POST IS STILL USEFUL.

The information in this post will help you download and save video files that are hosted on sites like Youtube, Supernovatube, Youku, Megavideo, and linked to by sites like SurfTheChannel.com, free-tv-video-online.info and watch-movies-links.net. It is a good idea to read the entire post before using any of these methods, as host sites have changed from time to time, and so have the methods you can use to download the streaming video files.

Seen the latest cool video on Youtube?  Want to save it on your hard drive so you can watch it again at your leisure or share it with your internetless friends?  Well, it’s simple – if you use Linux.  Everything I explain in this post was done on a computer running Ubuntu 8.10, but I think it will work with any distro.

Okay, let’s start with Youtube videos.  First, watch the video.  Then, before you navigate away from that web page, go and look in your system’s /tmp directory.  You should find a flash video file, named something like Flashbt0cVD.  That’s the file you want.  So move it to your home directory (or wherever you keep your videos) and rename it something more descriptive.

This trick will also work with the movie and TV videos  files streaming over the internet via sites like www.surfthechannel.com, www.free-tv-video-online.info, tv-video.net and www.watch-movies-links.net.

There is a problem.  One or two of the video links sites (like tv-video.net) delete temporary files when they have finished playing.  This means you can’t move the file out of /tmp after you’ve watched it.  The solution is to link the temporary file to one in your home directory before the temporary file is deleted.  So you start to play the video, then go look in the /tmp directory. You’ll find a randomly-named video file there.  You need to link it to your home directory.  Do this by running this command in terminal:

ln /tmp/Flashuh4G6s ~/video.flv

Now you have got the video file in your /home.  You have to make sure that the name you give to the new linked file does not already exist in the directory.  So in the example above, you would first check that there is no file called video.flv in your home directory.

But there’s another problem.  If you watch a video via the links sites that is hosted at Youku, the video will be delivered as a series of small files (12-13 MB each).  But this isn’t a serious problem.  When they’ve downloaded you can put the randomly-named files into the correct viewing order by checking the properties of the files, looking at the time when the files were created.

If you have any queries, feel free to leave Comments.

UPDATE: If you are a Windoze user and you want to learn how to save streamed media, you should check out this site. There you’ll find info on how to capture and save video from lots of websites, plus audio files from last.fm and other internet radio stations. I only use Linux, so I can’t verify the accuracy of the info. But it looks good.

UPDATE 2:
Here’s info about a couple more tools for downloading video from the web. One for grabbing BBC TV (and radio) content, and one for those Youtube videos we all know and love.

For some time now, users of any operating system have been able to watch BBC TV shows streamed over the internet by BBC iPlayer. But if you wanted to download programmes, you used Windows or you were shit out of luck.

Now, Linux users can download BBC content via the new iPlayer Desktop application. But I don’t like it. The content is crawling with DRM. And the player doesn’t work properly on my EEE PC. It might work okay on a better-specified computer. But iPlayer Desktop is compatible with just Intrepid and Jaunty and my desktop machine runs Hardy (I’m talking Ubuntu here – the app works on other distros too). Anyway, I don’t like the app so I’m not supplying a link to it. It’s my blog so blah! If you really want to try it for yourself, check out the “Labs” link on the iPlayer web page.

Anyway, if you want to download BBC TV and radio shows and you use Linux, there is an easy solution – get_iplayer.
This is how it works: Steve Jobs was desperate to sell his crappy iPhones in the UK. So he turned on his diabolical charm and convinced the BBC to offer iPlayer downloads to iPhones. This happened many moons ago, when only Windows OSes could download the content. But some dastardly fellow created a program that pretended to be an iPhone. Oh, and get this: the DRM that infects all the content downloaded from iPlayer is absent from the .mov files sent to iPhones and consequently computers running get_iplayer. It’s a command-line utility, which might put some people off. But as far as I’m concerned there isn’t much wrong with command-line utilities in Linux. So check it out!

The other video download solution I want to present here is the excellent pwnyoutube.com. The way this site works is simple. When you search for or go to watch a video on Youtube, you get an URL something like:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufzqypO2k_A
To download this video, you type that URL into your browser’s address bar, then add the letters “pwn” like this:
http://www.pwnyoutube.com/watch?v=ufzqypO2k_A
Go to that URL and you will find download links for the video in question. You can download the file in .flv flash format, and most are also available in mp4.

If you have an unreliable internet connection, you can marry pwnyoutube with wget to great effect. Let’s say you want a video of The Clash playing London Calling live. A search of Youtube may turn up this video URL:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Idwibw0-lb4
So, you run the edited URL in your browser:
http://www.pwnyoutube.com/watch?v=Idwibw0-lb4
This brings you to a web page offering 2 download links. You want the “high quality” mp4 version. But your network connection is lousy. If you set the browser to download this file, chances are the connection will drop before the download completes. But this is no problem. Just right-click on the download link and select “Copy Link Location”. Now open a terminal and paste the download url into the following command:
wget -c http://deturl.com/save-video.mp4?http%3A%2F%2Fv18.lscache5.c.youtube.com%2Fvideoplayback%3Fip%3D0.0.0.0%26sparams%3Did%252Cexpire%252Cip%252Cipbits%252Citag%252Cburst%252Cfactor%26itag%3D18%26ipbits%3D0%26signature%3D7ABACC132F8C18AAF6A0649B1669DB89EDFF0B83.AB3039808ECB20B7124585313CB75A55C2C7E4A1%26sver%3D3%26expire%3D1250665200%26key%3Dyt1%26factor%3D1.25%26burst%3D40%26id%3D21dc226f0d3e95be
Wget will download the file, and the -c flag means that if the connection is broken, you can run the same command when the link is resumed and wget will start the download where it left off.

Hope this helps.

UPDATE OF THE UPDATE: OMG they have ruined PWNYoutube!!! 😦

Back when I first wrote the review of PWNYoutube, it was simple, and great in its simplicity: you found the video’s URL, you added “pwn” to the URL, browsed to that URL… and you were given a couple of download links. I liked to right-click the link, copy it, then paste it into a wget command in the terminal. Brilliant, right?

But now, you do all that adding “pwn” to the URL stuff… but when you go to that URL, instead of getting a couple of simple download links, you are confronted with a bunch of complicated ridiculousness. “Use one of: SaveVid | YouDDL | ClipNabber | KeepVid…” etc etc etc. No simple download link. No simple wget. Just a bunch of downloading utilities/services/whatevers that I know nothing about, and which I want to know nothing about. Ruined, man. Ruuuiiinneddd!!!

I cast my weary eye over the options, and finally decided to try the bookmarklet. Dunno why, I guess maybe it sounded simple, or maybe unthreatening in its diminuitiveness. I successfully downloaded an mp4 (high quality) image file by using the bookmarklet – what you do is browse to a webpage that includes a Youtube video (it doesn’t have to be a web page actually on Youtube.com – many bloggers and webmasters have Youtube videos embedded in their own sites) and click on the bookmarklet. The resulting mp4 file played well in vlc, so I’ve got no issues in that regard. But changing the PWNYoutube interface so you no longer get a simple download link – that’s just bad. Shame on you, PWNYoutube!.

PWNYoutube – new interface. Boo!!

So, what’s the new PWNYoutube like? Well the bookmarklet works; I don’t know about the other utilities, if I get round to trying them I will post my verdict here. And I really should make an effort to try it all out. That’s what this blog post is all about, after all. But I’m so pissed off with PWNYoutube at the moment, I just don’t feel like doing it. If PWNYoutube can’t be bothered to provide me with a simple download link that works with wget, maybe I can’t be bothered to give them publicity. Fancy shmancy download utilities just don’t do it for me. I like wget. But PWNYoutube don’t like wget. Which makes it feel like PWNYoutube don’t like me.

YET ANOTHER UPDATE:

Here’s a couple more things relating to online video. First of all, some of the sites I have mentioned previously have become pretty crappy.  Surfthechannel.com is terrible nowadays.  All it seems to offer are links to buy videos from Amazon or watch videos streamed from Megavideo – and if you don’t sign up to become a member of Megavideo, you can’t watch anything longer than about 56 minutes.

But it’s not all bad news.  It has become easier to download videos from tv-video.net, and these downloaded files are in mp4 format and much better quality than the streamed flash videos.  To download these files, you need to use Firefox, and the Firefox add-on Video DownloadHelper.  When you’ve installed Firefox and the add-on, go to tv-video.net and navigate the site to watch the video you want.  When you click on “Play”, you’ll see the DownloadHelper icon change colour and start moving.  Click on the icon and you’ll get a drop-down menu with a number of options.  Choose to download the file.  Once the download has started, close the tab which contains the playing video: the download speed will increase considerably, and you won’t need the crappy flash version.

That’s all for now; but I’ll update this post as and when new video downloading methods come to light.

6 JUNE 2012: ANOTHER BLOODY UPDATE – but its not really a bad update:

The stuff I told you about at the start of this post, about grabbing video files out of the tmp directory, does not appear to work anymore.  Grr!  BUT:  If  you are using Firefox and have the DownloadHelper add-on, go to Project Free TV and select the TV show/movie you wanna save.  Start watching it; when it’s started properly, the DownloadHelper icon will become all colourful and rotating.  Click on that, and select Copy URL.  Now, go to a terminal and type in something like wget -c -O movie.flv then, before hitting Enter, right-click and select Paste.  That will paste in the actual URL of the movie you want.  Hit Enter, and wget will start downloading the movie.flv file (or whatever name you chose) to your Home directory. Note: in that wget command, the -O is a capital letter O, not a zero.  This seems to work with all the sites Project Free TV link with.  Dunno how long the trick will last, so get going while the going’s good!  Oh yeah, one you’ve got wget downloading the file, close the Firefox tab that’s playing the movie.  Otherwise the download will take much longer.  Good luck!!

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