Darknet Part 1: What is the darknet and why should I care?

23/06/2018

 

Welcome to Part 1 of my guide to the Darknet.  Well, I say “mine” but it’s actually by many people.  And, just so you all know I’m not trying to pass off this guide as my own words, I’m going to show the words actually coming out of their true creators’ mouths, thanks to the miracle of video streaming over the internet! Thanks be to Youtube,eh!!

Okay, part 1 of this series is a primer on the Deep Web and the Darknet.  It’s a TEDx talk by Alex Winter (of Bill & Ted fame), entitled “The Darknet isn’t what you think”.  There are some misconception about what illegal services were available through the Silk Road website.  For instance child pornography was banned.  Stolen goods weren’t allowed.  Ads for contract killers weren’t allowed.

Anyway, check out the vid.  Enjoy!

Next time: A film about the rise and fall of the Silk Road

 


A Paypal loophole

09/06/2018

Hate Paypal, but feel forced to use it anyway? I know I know I know. If you depend on  internet transactions, it might be the only way to get paid.  Check out this story about how a fleamarket flipper made a $19,000 profit with one transaction flipping a security tower, and how Paypal tried to keep the lot… and the flipper’s unexpected but effective fix for the problem!

And here’s a handy hint from http://www.paypalsucks.com:

A Paypal Loophole
Did you know that you can provide a false tracking number on a mocked up Australia Post docket, and Paypal will accept that as tracking! Even if you try checking the tracking, it will show invalid, but Paypal doesn’t even check and will award whoever needs to provide proof!

Great loophole to know!!! I just had it happen to me. I am seeking help from the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Wish me luck!!!

Sharon

Oh, and if you decide to click that button and Buy Me a Coffee – don’t worry about using Paypal, I’m the poor sod who could end up having the money frozen! (Only joking! Paypal’s brilliant, I swear!!)  😉

bmc-purple


ibVPN – safe web browsing for not much money

08/06/2018
ibvpn-4616-reviews

ibVPN – a high-rated VPN service with more than 180 servers world-wide

A VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a technology that creates a safe and encrypted connection over a less secure network, such as the internet. VPN technology was developed as a way to allow remote users and branch offices to securely access corporate applications and other resources. Nowadays VPNs are widely used to encrypt and secure an otherwise insecure connection (such as a public wifi access point – an eavesdropper can see everything you do over McDonalds’s wifi if it isn’t encrypted!); some people use VPN service to access restricted online service – eg if you live in the UK you won’t be able to use the US Netflix service as that is geographically restricted to users in the USA.  But if you use a VPN server based in the USA, Netflix won’t be able to tell that you’re not in the USA yourself – all Netflix can see is that your traffic is coming and going from that US-based server.  This feature also lends some anonymity to the internet connection, which is another reason some people use a VPN.

And  it’s not just geographical restrictions that VPN use can help you circumvent: some work and school networks stop users accessing some sites like Youtube for instance (your employer may want you to work rather than look at cat videos) or hacker sites (schools tend to block sites with crime-related content, and as so many people associate hacking with crime, anything containing the word “hacker” gets banned).  So, the local network won’t let you view what you want?  Use a VPN, and all the local net can see is data going to/coming from the VPN server.  It knows nothing about goddamn cat memes or how to crack Facebook accounts!

For the past few years I have been using ibVPN (“Invisible Browsing”), run by Romanian-based service provider Amplusnet.  It’s not the fastest service out there, but it is competitively-priced and has global availability.  ibVPN boasts of more than 180 servers in 47 countries across the globe.  And there are 4 different service plans:

  • Ultimate, at $4.83 per month –  “Great for strong privacy and securityheavy streamingunblocking restricted websitestorrents & p2p activity. The most complete package”
  • Standard, at $3.08 per month – “Great for regular usagestreamingunblocking restricted websitesprivacy protection. Includes access to VPN and Extensions. No SmartDNS.”
  • Torrent, also $3.08 per month – “Special package for those looking to protect their identity while downloading torrents. Privacy protection. No SmartDNS or Proxy.”
  • IBDNS/SmartDNS, also $3.08 per month – “Special package designed for unblocking restricted websitesand heavy streaming. Includes SmartDNS and access to browser extensions. No VPN.”

Their All-In-One client software/apps is available for Windows, Apple MacOS and iOS, and Android devices, and the services are also compatible with Linux, most routers, smart TVs and gaming consoles.  The interface is clean and efficient (see below).

ibVPN-All-in-one-client

ibVPN All-In-One client interface controls your VPN sessions

If you’re thinking of going with ibVPN but want to try before you buy, they offer a 6 hour free trial period.  And they have a 15 day money back guarantee if you’re not satisfied by the service.  This shows they have confidence in the quality of their product.

The speed of some servers/connections is not always great, but it is rarely appalling and the price is excellent.  All in all, a good service – I’ve been using it for some years now, which is the greatest praise any product could get – if I keep paying for something it’s because it’s the best!!  😉

Buy Me A Coffee


Free text messages! For everyone, everywhere!

31/05/2018

Nowadays text messages can be pretty cheap.  It doesn’t cost much to get a bundle or plan that gives you hundreds or even unlimited texts for a month.  And if you have a smartphone, you can use apps like Facebook’s Messenger to send messages for free. But if you’re not on such a plan, or can’t/won’t/don’t use Messenger, you have to pay the “standard rate” – in the UK, standard rate sms cost 12p on ee, and on Vodafone it is 14p!  That’s pretty dear really, especially if you need to send multiple messages – and if you are having a conversation with someone you’ll be sending a whole bunch of sms to each other.

text-messages

We all use text messages these days. For better or worse…

Which is where I come in.  To tell you how to send free text messages, from anywhere to anywhere. This is supposing that you have internet access, but of course I always assume that as you are reading this (which would be rather difficult if you didn’t have online access).  And I use a lot of posts on this blog to give you advice and examples on stuff you can do on the internet.

So to send free text messages from just about anywhere to just about anywhere, go to the website www.afreesms.com.  As I mostly send messages to people here in the UK, I use the dedicated UK service at www.afreesms.com/intl/united-kingdom as that saves having to select the country every time I want to send a message.  But for this, I’ll use the international service for examples.

Here’s what you see when you go to www.afreesms.com/freesms/:

afreesms

To start, you need to choose the country where the person is that you’re sending the message to.  You do this by clicking on the Country field at the top – this will give you a drop-down menu with nearly all the countries in the world on it.  Then in the Mobile Number field you type in the recipient’s mobile phone number.  You see that there is a + symbol at the start: this means the number is in International format so you type the number without the leading zero; let’s imagine my number is 07890123456, so to send me a message you’ll put in my number like 7890123456.

Now we get the Message field which is, surprise surprise, where you type your message.  Remember, this is sms, so your message must fit in the 160 character limit (but don’t worry if that’s not enough, you can send more messages).

Now we come to the Sender ID field.  Here they want you to put your mobile number, in international format.  If I was sending a message to someone, I would plug in my country code – UK, which is +44 – and my number without the leading zero, so it would be +447890123456.  I’m not sure why they want this info, maybe it’s about international sanctions; on the UK page, where people only send messages from the UK to the UK, they don’t ask for this.  But if you’re sending sms abroad you have to do it.

Next it’s the Verification Code.  The display shows a 6-digit number, which you have to copy into the box.  And there’s a refresh image which you might have to click on if you’ve taken a long time to type everything and the link has expired.

And finally, all done, you click the Send button at the very bottom of the page.

You should remember that sometimes the Verification Code or Send button is covered by an advert box.  Just click the X to kill the ad, and you can get to the fields you need.

In the FAQ they claim they have a 99% Success Delivery Rate, and if a message doesn’t get through it is because of the following:

  • Invalid mobile number.
  • The mobile phone that you are trying to reach has been switch off or is out of coverage.
  • Carrier-to-carrier error or network congestions.
  • If the status is Delivered and you do not receive this means either your country is blocking our numbers or there is no carrier-to-carrier SMS agreement in place.

In my experience, some messages just get lost somewhere along the way.  So I tend to send my messages twice, and one of them will get through.  This isn’t a problem for me as the service is free.

There is also an anti-spam policy (like just about every online messaging service, from email to Messenger).  And a fair use policy.  Other than that, you can send as many texts as you want, from just about any country to just about any country.  Here’s the list from their website (also links to the relevant page):

中国 (China) 台灣 (Taiwan) 日本国 (Japan) 澳門 (Macau) 香港 (Hong Kong)
대한민국 (South Korea) Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria

 

American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria
Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados
Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda
Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil
British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso
Burundi Côte D’Ivoire Cambodia Cameroon Canada
Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile
Christmas Island Cocos Keeling Islands Colombia Comoros Congo
Congo-Kinshasa Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cuba

 

Curacao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti
Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt
El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia
Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France
French Guiana French Polynesia Gabon Gambia Georgia
Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland
Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey
Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras

 

Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran
Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy

 

Jamaica Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya
Kiribati Korea, North Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos
Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya
Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macedonia Madagascar
Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta
Mariana Islands Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius
Mayotte Island Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco
Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique
Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands
New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria

 

Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan
Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay
Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico
Qatar Reunion Island Romania Russia Rwanda
Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal
Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten / Saint Martin
Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa

 

South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname
Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Tajikistan
Tanzania Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands
Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom
United States Uruguay US Virgin Islands Uzbekistan Vanuatu
Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Islands Yemen Zambia
Zimbabwe

Iran is on the list.  North Korea, as “Korea, North” is also there, but South Korea isn’t.  I can’t see what other countries are missing – if any more are missing – if you notice any, please let us all know in Comments.

All in all a good service.  Make the most of it before it goes away.

 


bmc-yellow


“Guerilla Open Access Manifesto” by Aaron Swartz

29/07/2017

Aaron_Swartz_profile

Aaron Swartz was a computer programmer, writer, political organiser, hacker, and hacktivist of note.  Amongst other accomplishments he founded Watchdog.net, “the good government site with teeth,” to aggregate and visualize data about politicians, was a co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee and Demand Progress; with Virgil Griffith he worked on Tor2web, an early (2008) HTTP proxy for Tor-hidden services and with Kevin Poulsen he created Dead Drop (now known as “Secure Drop”), a mechanism allowing whistleblowers to send files to the media anonymously.  He was prosecuted for making the data in JSTOR, a digital repository of academic journal articles, available to users for free.  He refused a plea bargain that would have seen him serve 6 months in a low-security prison, preferring to make the authorities justify the prosecution.  He faced a possible 50 years of imprisonment and $1 million in fines, for pursuing the hacker belief that all information wants to be free.  Swartz committed suicide on January 11, 2013. After his death, federal prosecutors dropped the charges. [Thanks to Wikipedia.org for the above.]  He was a champion for freedom, in the best hacker tradition, and nine years ago he wrote the following manifesto.

Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for
themselves. The world’s entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries
in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and locked up by a handful of
private corporations. Want to read the papers featuring the most famous results of the
sciences? You’ll need to send enormous amounts to publishers like Reed Elsevier.

There are those struggling to change this. The Open Access Movement has fought
valiantly to ensure that scientists do not sign their copyrights away but instead ensure
their work is published on the Internet, under terms that allow anyone to access it. But
even under the best scenarios, their work will only apply to things published in the future.
Everything up until now will have been lost.

That is too high a price to pay. Forcing academics to pay money to read the work of their
colleagues? Scanning entire libraries but only allowing the folks at Google to read them?
Providing scientific articles to those at elite universities in the First World, but not to
children in the Global South? It’s outrageous and unacceptable.

“I agree,” many say, “but what can we do? The companies hold the copyrights, they
make enormous amounts of money by charging for access, and it’s perfectly legal —
there’s nothing we can do to stop them.” But there is something we can, something that’s
already being done: we can fight back.

Those with access to these resources — students, librarians, scientists — you have been
given a privilege. You get to feed at this banquet of knowledge while the rest of the world
is locked out. But you need not — indeed, morally, you cannot — keep this privilege for
yourselves. You have a duty to share it with the world. And you have: trading passwords
with colleagues, filling download requests for friends.

 

Meanwhile, those who have been locked out are not standing idly by. You have been
sneaking through holes and climbing over fences, liberating the information locked up by
the publishers and sharing them with your friends.

But all of this action goes on in the dark, hidden underground. It’s called stealing or
piracy, as if sharing a wealth of knowledge were the moral equivalent of plundering a
ship and murdering its crew. But sharing isn’t immoral — it’s a moral imperative. Only
those blinded by greed would refuse to let a friend make a copy.

Large corporations, of course, are blinded by greed. The laws under which they operate
require it — their shareholders would revolt at anything less. And the politicians they
have bought off back them, passing laws giving them the exclusive power to decide who
can make copies.

There is no justice in following unjust laws. It’s time to come into the light and, in the
grand tradition of civil disobedience, declare our opposition to this private theft of public
culture.

We need to take information, wherever it is stored, make our copies and share them with
the world. We need to take stuff that’s out of copyright and add it to the archive. We need
to buy secret databases and put them on the Web. We need to download scientific
journals and upload them to file sharing networks. We need to fight for Guerilla Open
Access.

With enough of us, around the world, we’ll not just send a strong message opposing the
privatization of knowledge — we’ll make it a thing of the past. Will you join us?

Aaron Swartz

July 2008, Eremo, Italy

bmc-orange


How to rip dvds – including “copy-protected disks” – with dvd::rip and vlc

27/03/2016

Disclaimer: I never ever break the law.  Any suggestion that I do so, regularly and in flagrant disregard of conventional norms, is unintended and all I can say in my defence is that you must have misunderstood what I’ve written (I often write fiction – maybe this blog entry is fiction.  Lies, lies; all is lies!).  Anyway, don’t never do wrong!! (was that a double negative?)

I hate buying DVDs.  Bittorrent is beautiful, it takes away all that parting with money nonsense.  But another way to get cool videos is having friends who buy DVDs then lend them out to their friends.  Including you!  Except you don’t watch the thing once then give it back – you riiip it first!

piracy-is-not-a-victimless-crime-resized

Don’t copy DVDs!  Not only is it illegal, it’s not a victimless crime.  Think of the poor movie stars, the directors, the multi-millionaire producers.  And the children!  Won’t somebody please think of the children? [image shamelessly borrowed from the Intellectual Property Rights Center (whoever they are).  Don’t sweat it, IPRCENTER, you can have the image back when we’ve finished using it…]

I like using dvd::rip despite its stupid name.  I mean, what’s up with the double-colons?  They’re invisible to Google as far as I can make out.  Luckily for you, I (the King of stealing shit) found the dvd::rip download page.

Now for the bad news (so far as most of you are concerned – it’s a Linux program!!!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Linux FTW!!  If you want to learn how to rip DVDs with Windows or Mac, you’ll have to look elsewhere.  But don’t give up the hunt too quickly.  Tenacity is a great quality for a pirate, hacker, oil-field surveyer, just about anyone to have.  And if that doesn’t work out for ya, get yerself a Linux OS.  Ubuntu is my favourite (also my first, so I may be biased) but there are lots of other distros to try.

Okay, so you have Linux (Ubuntu!  Ubuntu!  Choose Ubuntu!) installed.  Now you need a DVD ripping software.  My personal choice is dvd::rip, despite its stupid name.  It’s a stupid name because those dumb double-colons stop you from installing the program via the command line (ie sudo apt-get install application-x).  But the Ubuntu Software Centre will find it easily enough, or the package manager of whatever Linux distro you’ve installed.  Tell it to install, and in a jiffy dvd::rip will be downloaded and installed, stupid double-colons and all  (depending on how fast your internet connection is and how long you consider a jiffy to be).

If, for some reason, your distro installation system doesn’t find dvd::rip, you can find downloads in various formats here.

Okay, you have dvd::rip installed on your system and you have a DVD you want to rip.  We’re nearly there: all you gotta do is to stick in the DVD and rriiiip it.

Insert the DVD, then run dvd::rip.  Under the File menu, click on New Project.  The next screen will want some storage path information.  By default the project is called unnamed.  If you change it in the Project name box, it will automagically change in the other boxes too.  Note that the files created by dvd::rip will appear in a sub-directory of your home directory. Now click on the button labelled +create project. dvd::rip will want to know where to put the *.zip file.  For this example, I’m ripping the DVD of the movie The Departed, so I called the project “departed”.  So dvd::rip wants to know where to put the file departed.rip file.  I generally just stick them in my home directory.  Choose where you want your *.rip file to be stored, then click OK.

Now the program wants some info about the DVD device you’re using.  Generally leave this as it is, unless you’re using an external or non-default DVD device.  You’ll be offered a ripping choice: Copy data from DVD to harddisk before encoding or Encode DVD on the fly.  I choose the first because it is quicker and puts less strain on the DVD devices.  It also enables “interesting features”, but I haven’t explored these yet.

 

dvdrip-save-project-departed

So, you’ve selected the DVD device and ripping mode.  Now click on the greyed-out button RIP Title.  This brings you to a new screen.  There’s a big empty space here which will fill with the DVD’s contents when you click the button Read DVD table of contents. Click it.

A list of the table of contents will be printed to the screen.  In the case of The Departed it’s pretty obvious which particular title you want to rip: there are only 2 options, and one is only 1 second long.  So title 2, all 2 hours and 25 minutes of it, is the one you want.

dvdrip-tableofcontents

 

Sometimes choosing is more difficult.  Generally, the longer item is the one you want.  Sometimes though. a sneaky attempt at “copy protection” (hah!) presents you with a long list of titles of almost identical lengths.  There’s a pretty easy way of working out which title is the one you want to rip.  I will explain how to get past this ridiculous attempt at “copy-protection” later*.  But, to continue with this example, it’s clear which track you want to rip. So high-light it (by clicking on it) then click on Rip selected title(s)/chapter(s) near the bottom of the screen.  The status bar at the bottom of the screen will start turning orange – the more orange you can see, the more of the DVD has been ripped.  So now it’s a waiting game.  Large files can take 45 minutes or more ro rip!  So now’s a good time to make some coffee, maybe watch some TV show you downloaded from the internet, you naughty pirate, you!

When  the ripping is done, the status bar at the bottom of the screen will not be orange any more.  It will  be clear, except for some text telling you how much free space you have left on your hard disk.  Now click on Transcode.  On the Transcoding page, usually the only changes from the default are under Video Bitrate Calculation: by Target media I choose from the drop-down menus One x 850 MB  Then I click on Transcode, and sit back to watch the status bar fill with orange again – or maybe watch some more illegal content while waiting for the transcoding to finish…  By default dvd::rip makes 2 passes transcoding, which can take some time…

At the end of all this transcoding… and waiting… and transcoding… and waiting… that status bar will trn colourless again, with some text saying how much diskspace is left.  The ripping is complete.  Go to ~/dvdrip-data, and in the directory named avi you will find your movie in an avi video file -move it to where you keep your video files .  The sub-directories tmp and vob may as well be deleted, as I haven’t found a use for them yet. The files in the vob directory are especially large – in the case of The Departed, there were 8 .vob files, all but one weighing in at 1.1 GB each!  They may be useful (perhaps for transferring the movie to another video DVD?) but I haven’t looked into that yet.  So I do myself a favour by deleting the contents of the dvdrip-data directory and freeing up the disk space.

*The sneaky yet futile attempt at “copy protecting”.

I told you that I’d get to this nonsense, and so I have.  Some DVDs, when their tables of content are open, list many titles as the one you want to copy.  You can’t tell them apart very easily, as they are all near enough the same length.  But only one of them is the track you want.  The others are a school of red herrings, containing just parts of the movie or other such crap.  What you need is “The 99 Video Titles Fix”.  What you need is vlc.

vlc should be available through the Software Centre or Synaptic (I’m assuming that you’re using Ubuntu. It might be in the package manager of other Linux distros.  If you’re having problems finding it, have a look at the VideoLAN site for possibly useful information. And Google.  Never forget the mantra: Google Is Your Friend.)  If you’re going to rip one of these “copy protected” disks with dvd::rip you are going to need vlc.  Unless you know of another method, in which case please share this other method in Comments below (or if you’re shy, send it to me direct via the Contact Form button at the top of this page.

captain-america-the-first-avenger-resized

This guy is a dick.  Really!  I ended up cheering for the Red Skull, that Captain was so goody-two-shoed.  And a shield?  FFS! [image stolen, I mean borrowed, from amazon.com]

Anyway.  A friend of mine lent me his DVD of Captain America: The First Avenger, and an evil voice in my ear whispered “Rip the DVD and add it to your goodly-sized collection of comics-based movies.”  You see, I collect comics-based movies.  The good voice in my other ear said something like “Mmph! Mmmph!” like it had been gagged or something.  Anyway, I’m easily led, so I set to ripping Captain America.

But those evil guys at Hydra, I mean Marvel Studios, had employed a fool-proof method of copy protection.  I fired up dvd::rip, had it read the table of contents, and look what it showed me!

cappy-table-of-contents

99 tracks in total, 16 of which were about the right size to be the one I wanted.  But only one was the right one.  So what to do?  Rip all 16 possibles?  That would take a bloody long time.  There had to be a quicker way, I thought.  And I was right.  I consulted my good friend Google and it found this for me.

Basically, fire up vlc,  then select Media > Open Disc.

vlc-open-disc

Next select the type of disc you’re about to play (DVD), enter the device name and path (VLC will select the most likely device – or use Browse and click Play to start playback.

vlc-disk-selection

Now start watching the movie – make sure you’ve gone through any menus and the correct movie you want to rip is playing, then click Playback > Title.  In the example below you can see it’s Title 1; but when this so-called “copy protection” is in use the correct Title could be any, from 1 to 99 or however many they’ve decided to put on the disk to dissuade potential pirates.  Bloody idiots: no matter how many layers of armour they embed their precious movie in, there’s always a way through!

vlc-title

So now you know which Title is the one you want, go back to dvd::rip and select that Title.  And Abracadabra!  The movie is yours!  If you’re a wicked pirate, that is, and I would never condone piracy.  I feel I must repeat: this blog post is fictional – I’ve never ripped a DVD in my life – and all th info is strictly for educative, abstract purposes.  They hang pirates, you know?  Seen the end of Pirates of the Caribbean, where cunning Jack Sparrow escapes the hangman’s noose?  Well, that’s fiction.  (If you haven’t seen that movie, you could probably find it via bittorrent; or a friend may have a DVD you could borrow… 😉 )

giffgaff1

Click on Stewie if you want amazing value mobile phone service including 4G and £5 extra free credit!

 

Buy Me A Coffee


Blowing Whistles

18/02/2016

If you’re at all interested in the case of NSA whistle-blower Ed Snowden, you may be interested in watching the excellent documentary film Citizen 4.  You can download it from here.  Well worth checking out.

Edward_Snowden-2

Ed Snowden.  Image from Wikimedia.


%d bloggers like this: